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, los angeles. >> cecilia, thank you. >>> and now, made in america tonight and a hopeful sign from ford. the automaker announcing its plan to pump three quarters of a billion dollars into plants in michigan. 2,300 new jobs. >>> and speaking of made in america, our christmas challenge. and tonight, the big reveal here. the factories saying thank you for the joy and the jobs you created. merry christmas. it was the made in america christmas challenge. you can see the christmas lights are up. across the country, even the mall of america. inside, santa taking those requests. david muir with "world news." how are you? >> oh, good. how are you? >> reporter: i'm just curious. of those kids sitting on santa's lap, how much of what they're asking for is made in america? >> oh, oh. i guess -- ah -- i guess -- i guess -- >> reporter: you'll remember, even the elf was stumped, telling us he couldn't answer those kinds of questions. but if you look closely, we guaranteed you could find made in america. just one thing, $64, creates 200,000 jobs, say economists. and it turns out, you found it. viewers
angeles. >> our thanks to cecilia tonight. >>> we turn now to made in america tonight and to a hopeful headline from ford tonight. in fact, the automaker announcing an ambitious investment plan, to create more than 2,300 new jobs. that's great news. and speaking of made in america, after our month-long made in america christmas challenge, tonight, the big reveal here. we're inside factories big and small tonight, saying thank you, for the joy and the jobs you helped create. >> merry christmas. >> reporter: it was the made in america christmas challenge. you see the christmas lights are up. people across the country, even the mall of america. inside, santa takes those requests. david muir with "world news." how are you? >> oh, good. >> reporter: i'm just curious. of the kids sitting on santa's lap, how much what they're asking for is made in america? >> oh, oh. i guess -- ah -- i guess -- i guess -- >> reporter: you'll remember, even the elf was stumped, telling us he couldn't answer those kinds of questions. if you look closely, we guaranteed you could find made in america. just one th
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
that were necessary to achieve the long-term bipartisan debt-reduction program that america desperately needs. we're over $16.4 trillion in debt. i'm in my last days as a u.s. senator. if you'd told me when i started that we'd be $16 trillion in debt, i wouldn't have believed it. frankly, if you told me just a dozen years ago at the end of the clinton administration when we were in surplus that we could possibly be $16 trillion in de debt, i would have thought -- well, i would have thought you were not reality-tested. but here we are, and most everybody knows that the way we're going to get out of this is with a combination of tough medicine. i call it tough love. we're going to have to reduce spend, and we can't do it all from discretionary spending. and the budget control act that we adopted last summer -- that is, the sum o summer of 2011 --s it all from discretionary spending. what's discretionary spending? it's different from entitlement spending -- medicare, medicaid, et cetera. it's what most people think of as the government. it's education programs, it's environmental protectio
of the united states of america to be left almost alone in the united nations against so many other countries, including the best trends of america to defend the state of israel and then to find out the next morning that israel is doing something which america explicitly is against i think you'd have been thinking twice about his position and therefore i think it was a mistake. i think we should have manifested a much greater understanding for the sensitivities of the united states and i criticize it -- >> rose: so the prime minister -- >> i think it was not the right thing to do. >> rose: when you looked a hamas have they been strengthened by this? >> well, their status, i think, has changed to the degree that at the final point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most author
there was a terrorist attack on america. and though we suffered a horrific attack, the strength, resilience and extraordinary acts of kindness of the american people showed the world that attempts to destroy our way of life would never succeed. on that day, no one could get in or out of washington, and many communication networks were inoperable. so when the pentagon was hit, and the capitol was evacuated, my staff and i walked one block to my home on capitol hill. just as example, the husband of my office manager worked in the section of the pentagon had been hit, so we were on the phone, the one phone that we had, the hospitals, the police, anyone that we thought might be able to tell us if he was safe. thankfully, he was fine. but there were so many who waited for hours, who called hospitals to hear from their loved ones. sometimes the news was a relief, and sometimes they waited in vain for good news. and i have to say that it was an incredible moment when the senators who could find each other, where ever they had gone from the capital, we finally gathered early -- well, late afternoon
that group selection is the reason for human evolution. steve cole, president of the new america foundation, investigates the power and global influence of exxonmobil in "private empire: exxonmobil and american power." for an extended list of ligs to 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> booktv continues now with diana furchtgott-roth. she takes a look at president obama's green jobs initiative and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm howard, vice president for policy research at the manhattan institute. thanks so much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one o
. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it is not brazil. it's actually much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i'll talk to pulitzer-prize winning historian ann applebalm. we focus on decision making. in the depths of the financial crisis, the obama administration had an almost impossible choice -- save chrysler by injecting billions of taxpayer dollars, or let it fail and lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve rattner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the washington conventional wisdom about the ma
senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and dads were able to save for their retirement on an equal basis with their counterparts who worked outside the home. i now it is one of her proudest achievements and i'm proud to join with the senator from merrell, senator barbara mikulski, in attempting to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course
is coming true. they have an opportunity today, right now, to make sure that middle-class america not only texas of our to do less but has a great christmas. and making sure they have a tax cut january 1. we have done $1 trillion and medicare and we have done our position on taxes and we're waiting for the specifics. it is pretty simple. >> will also passed a farm bill on the son of that which was bipartisan which almost -- with almost $24 billion in cuts which they can pass and have additional cuts. >> will there be any deal to raise the tops -- top tax rates? >> we ran an election on that issue. we campaigned on a and the american people are for it. there are large numbers of republicans for it. the logic here is very, very simple -- speaker behner should go to the top rate or if he does not want to, he can simply tell the members of his caucus if you want to sign the discharge petition, there is no recrimination on our side. and we will get the first major down payment on which we know has the support of the majority of the american people and the majority of both houses in the congress
. what america should be addressing is two things. one, we should be addressing generational theft. we now as a country borrow 40 cents of every dollar that the government spends, and we've accumulated 16 trillion dollars in debt. now, in 2008 obama called nine trillion dollars in debt. he said that was irresponsible, unpatriotic. to say this another way, we're literally stealing money from our children and our grandchildren. now, this is the kind of generational theft that has never happened in this country until now, and neerlt part neits addressing this on a regular basis. both parties are arguing over how to tax the rich. now, number two. greed and overspending. for all the talk about greedy rich people in america, how is it possible that politicians' greed is never addressed? after all, they robbed the social security trust fund. they spent it. that's your retirement money that was supposed to be put away in a safe lock box. they spent that money. medicare is also headed for bankruptcy, and obama just raided that to the tune of $$716 billion. why? he wanted that money for obama ca
percentage points. bank of america is the biggest gainer hitting a 52-week high. david: energy stocks rising as oil climbed about $0.37 to settle above the $87 mark. energy sh giants chevron and coo ending in the plus. liz: consumer names getting a boost. adding time warner, walgreens, we just spoke, this is of course a consumer staple that people have loved along with names of her shoes. gettinhitting repetitive 52-week highs. david: apple, the ceo says he has a responsibility to create jobs, but how about creating shareholder value, where should the focus be after two months of a 25% loss of share value, should that be the target of tim cook and apple? liz: this is a huge crane maker and a food company have a great year, the stock up 70% thanks in part to having his hands in the cranes and food services part. he is going to be joining us exclusively this hour. here's why you have listened to him. is he keeping up pace in the new year and what part of his business is doing better. david: we have a very busy hour coming up, but what drove the market with the "data download." stocks pushing h
than ever before. >> rose: you're bullish on america? >> i think on the energy side for sure. and i'd say on the -- the one thing that never goes away in the united states is the incredible accept of entrepreneurs. so i think if we can get a set of great entrepreneurs, we can go after some big opportunities like energy. there's no reason why the united states can't continue to grow. >> rose: can manufacturing come back to america? >> if you looked -- i'm 30 year g.e. guy. so when i started it was probably 25% of american jobs were manufacturing, now it's 9%. so it is going to go back to be 25% again? probably not. could it be in the low teens? yes. >> rose: apple just announced today -- >> i saw that. i saw what tim did. we brought jobs back to the united states. i think american work force is very productive. i think in the sets of technologies that we make today you can make them here. i actually think that the relationships in general between unions and business and things like that have all progressed over time and the work force is very productive. so there's no reason why the
to america. right now china is the leading country. russia is certainly in the top 5 with over 700,000 orphans in that country. there's certainly plenty of children who need a loving family here in the united states. >> suarez: how about that side of the story. unicef estimate there is's only about 18,000 russian families looking to adopt children. that's a disproportionate number considering the need for new homes. >> it is. last year alone here in america there were a thousand children adopted from russia. there are many american families, many of whom right now are in the process of adopting these children that are willing, ready, and able to adopt these kids, some of which have severe special needs. so it speaks to the heart of these american families that are willing to adopt these kids and bring them home. the. >> suarez: but there have been unfortunate stories that have gotten a lot of attention here in the united states and back in russia >> does that make things more difficult for your organization and others that are watching international adoptions? >> sure, well, i thin
>>> this is "world news." tonight, the breaking news here. no deal. washington taking america right over the fiscal cliff. and when that ball comes down in times square tonight, every american's taxes will go up. what happened? >>> the other breaking story tonight. hillary's health. doctors reveal it is a blood clot near mrs. clinton's brain keeping her in the hospital. dr. besser right here with what this means. and what mrs. clinton just told barbara walters after becoming the most traveled secretary of state. >> are you exhausted? >> i am. to be honest, i am. >>> the big chill. a million americans in times square tonight. this evening, the security, the weather. some of the coldest temperatures of the winter. and what we didn't note about something else that will be falling at midnight. ginger zee in times square. >>> and, so long. >> so long. so long. so long. >> the man who said himself, "the show must go on." the first new year's without dick clark, as we heard tonight from his wife. she answers the one question she says so many have been asking her. >>> good evening on this n
>>> good morning, america. and happening now, a slow and slippery commute for over half the country this morning. and now, more snow to blanket major cities, from chicago to cincinnati. the new storm targeting the northeast this weekend. sam is tracking the latest. >>> medical alert. several people now dead from this season's flu. is the virus spiking and spreading faster than normal right now? is it too late to get your shots? >>> family feud. the 21-year-old musical theater major who told the judge she was being stalked. a restraining order just issued. and who does she say is after her? her parents. >> i wasn't in control of my life anymore. >> we hear from her, in an abc news exclusive. ♪ highway to the danger zone >>> is maverick back on the dating scene? the top gun bouncing back from his high-profile heartbreak. it's more than six months since he split from katie holmes. is this his newest leading lady? >>> the music is mere coincidence this morning. i promise. it takes us all to a place many of us want to forget, i can assure you. >> i loved it. >> i loved it, too. happy f
that the president of afghanistan, america's ally, told me that the u.s. is partly to blame for the insecurity that continues here. but that was his unmistakable message today. >> for a number of years now, there is a growing perception in afghanistan that a significant apart of the insecurity in afghanistan is caused by the way the united states and some of its allies promoted lawlessness in afghanistan. spreading corruption in afghanistan, by employing private security firms who became a law into their own hands, there were also contracts and contractors for all supplies, and all of the supplies, they were run over with corruption. >> would you agree that some of these would be intentional in the security, brought by nato and the united states? >> there is a very strong perception that some of that security is intentional, yes. >> reporter: i also asked president karzai what he would say to an american family who lost a loved one in this war. he said that the afghan people are grateful for the sacrifice but accused u.s. leaders of being more interested in american security than the sacrifice
recounts the life of america's sixth president on quincy adams who died in 1848. quincy adams was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the
of america shared in that growth. by making education affordable, by fostering innovation and job creation, and providing economic security to retirees through medicare and social security, our country went from a paralyzing great depression to an economic superpower. we were able to accomplish such a drastic transformation because we were willing to consider revenue as a way to invest in the future, as a way to promise security to our seniors -- economic security to our seniors. focusing spending on policies that work and balancing revenue is at the core of this debate. i've made tough choices in the 1990's that balance the budget, generated a surplus and supported robust job creation. in january of 1993, unemployment stood at 7.3%. in january 2001, that rate had been reduced to 3.9%. that period of record growth also saw an important decline in the poverty rate. in 1993, 15.1% of americans were in poverty. but thanks to job growth and an expanding economy, based upon a balanced approach to deficit reduction, including revenue and targeted reduction in expenditures, poverty fell to 11.3%
, the slogan better read than dead. but, we strongly rejected the idea that america represented the losing side in the struggle against soviet expansionism and the communist play that went with it. to the anti-communist passion we shared with chambers, inseparable from a commensurately powerful love for and faith in the united states of america and the civilization for which it had gone to war against the two great carriers of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one
. welcome to tax eeerything america. good morning, everyone. income, dividend, interest, deductions, all financial transactions, granny's new hip, your mortgage interest. as we start the week it's all about raising taxes not cutting spending. tax everything. but there are rich people who will avoid the obama tax increases the board of directors at costco will get a huge tax windfall by paying themselves a big dividend this year. and jim senegal, charlie monger, bill gates' father all on the board in favor of taxing the rich, really? and the debate on guns front and center. that murder-suicide involving the kansas city linebacker brings on the call for gun control and the possibility of head injuries in football and drugs and alcohol. all right, everybody, monday morning, "varney & company" about to begin. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba ding the great rrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trus, which ishy he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry
to you here on "america's newsroom". martha: we'll talk about the jobs number that came in this morning. this is the november number. down to 7.7%. that is the lowest number we've seen since december of 2008. but the internal numbers look like this. the labor department says that 350,000 people dropped out of the workforce and stuart varney feels that number is very significant. he joins me now. host of "varney & company". good morning, stuart. >> morning martha. bill:. martha: talk to me about both those numbers. >> that 7.7% rate first announced that was a surprise. it had not been expected to go down. then you dig within the numbers you come up with that very important number, 350,000. that is by how many people the labor force shrank, contracted. when you take out 350,000 from the total workforce, then you do get the unemployment rate coming down. so that number, 350,000. that is very significant and that explains, that's a large part of the explanation for the decline in the rate, martha. martha: there's another interesting number that reflects that. that is the labor participation
overseas. good morning i'm bill hemmer. whole new week here at "america's newsroom". martha: i'm martha maccallum. this fallen hero was a member of navy "seal team 6" that carried out the mission to kill usama bin laden. according to officials in afghanistan they came under heavy fire with this mission. >> according to our information the kidnappers were taliban. they were heavily armed with heavy machine guns, with so-called rpg. rocket propelled grenades and ak-47s. bill: steve centanni follows up in washington. what can we report about this rescue machine? >> reporter: good morning bill. it took place early sunday after intelligence revealed the kidnapped american was in imminent danger of injury or death. dr. joseph is a medical advice sore for a group called "morningstar" development based in colorado springs. it is a group that helps rebuild communities in afghanistan. the doctor was not injured. this happened in eastern kabul province. they were abducted by a group of five men while returning to a visit at a medical clinic. an isaf spokesman describes the rescue effort. >> it was a c
, i can assure you. good morning to you, america. >> i loved it. >> i loved it, too. happy friday. george, robin, lara, all at home with their families today. great to have amy, paula and rachel back with us this morning. >>> also, a very big headline in the fiscal cliff showdown. now, just four days from heading over the edge. the meeting that could change it all today at the white house. jon karl is here with the very latest on that. >>> and then, we have a shocking headline this morning. teachers training to shoot guns on the job. using this holiday break to learn how to handle firearms. applications for these classes are up all across the country. we're going to talk much more about that in a bit. >>> we want to get right to the breaking news this morning. it affects so many americans hoping to adopt. the president of russia has just signed a bill, banning americans from adopting russian children. and this now blocks kids from being adopted by american families, leaving russia, to move here to start a new life. abc's lama hasan has the latest from london. good morning to you,
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, kathy kaye. egypt's president says his heart is heavy, but he promises there will be no return to the days of dictatorship lighting a joint is now legal in washington. >> i hope that nobody in the world will be sent to prison for taking drugs ever again. i hope that anybody who lies a drug problem will get help. >> and he is the monster of concrete with curbs. capitald his nation's and touched the world. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after days of demonstrations, the egyptian pres
was bombed by boko-haram. >> thank you very much. i work for the voice of america. you know much about pakistan. in comparison to the last 15 years, how much the relationship between the pakistani-based military organization, especially those in power, they are in bed with al qaeda or others? one of the pakistani federal ministers said the islamic -- they have relations with the extremist organization there. he has provided whatever evidence he has. there was also talk from the pakistani officials [inaudible] in your comparison, do you see the relationship being broken? >> that is a big question. i will try to be very brief. the connections between various to extremist groups in pakistan and al qaeda remained deep. as i suggested, i think mumbai plot, if carefully studied, underscores those connections. i think we have seen it in other instances. people tend to give away their real feelings in moments of grief. for the jihad to groups in pakistan, the death of been great.xpressed his it is hard to say they don't have a connection in moments of the eulogy when they are terribly sorry to
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
and lactose intolerance on america this morning. jon by the way has a big show. senators chuck schumer and jon kyl on "this week." a lot of news developing overnight. we go to mr. ron claiborne who has extraordinary videotape. >> out of russia. a plane crash outside of moscow. we'll begin with this stunning video. the plane overshot the runway and careened into traffic and abc has the story. >> reporter: you're about to see the terrifying moment of impact as the russian passenger jet slams into a busy highway. watch again. you can see the plane's tire colliding with the moving car. and listen closely. you can hear the squealing brakes and crushing metal. the crash took place on saturday at an airport outside moscow. the red wing's airline's flight broke through a barrier fence shattering into three pieces and bursting into flames before skidding to a stop at the edge of the highway. witnesses rushed to pull survivors out of the wreckage. the russian made tupolev 204 was flying back from the czech republic with no passengers and eight crew members on board. officials say four of them were kille
:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these reports in conjunction with the energy security leadership council, the policy staff, jonna hamilton, jame
signs advertising them. and in doing so, they tell every insane killer in america that schools are the safest place to inflict maximum mayhem with minimum risk. >> lapierre went on to blame the media for what we have been seeing in terms of mass murders. we'll talk to the media critic with "the washington post." he's standing by for that angle for me. first, tom foreman, to you in washington. we heard lapierre speaking minutes upon minutes upon minutes how it is uniquely prepared to help, train people, arm every school in the nation. i want to know from you, how is washington reacting now to what he said today? >> well, you know, i'll tell you something, washington reacts cautiously to anything the nra says. i'll tell you why. yes, there is a national sense right now of people wanting to say we should do something about this and maybe some kind of gun laws would make a difference as the president mentioned. there has been a slight tick in the polls in favor of that. but, washington is aware for 20 years, public opinion has been running the other way. gallop tracked the fact tha
saying none of it will lead to change. >>> i'm s.e. cupp. i like red, white and blue. buy america. >>> no one likes last-minute holiday shopping. i have a gift for the sports fan who has everything. >>> will it be pink or blue presents under my family tree? it is not both. i have an announcement. hit follow and come along for "the cycle." >>> the mayans believe the world ends tonight. that's one way to end the fol follies of washington. the rivalry between president obama and speaker boehner is taking over d.c. rivalry, mayans, makes me think of basketball since the mayans invented the earliest form of basketball. >> no. >> it's a fact. >> it is thursday. of course i'm doing sports metaphors. what else did you expect? we start with the new york knicks and the nets. we'll get to d.c. too. so you know, really compromise in there. >> talks to the heartland, people, there. >> all right, guys. the last two times these teams met it was the nail bite we are fans not sure who would be ahead at the final buzz. on wednesday, the latest, knick star anthony returned to the hardwood coming off
>>> good morning, america. this morning, buried in more than a foot of snow. look at this. a 20-car pileup and the cancellation boards at the airport, and now the coldest temperatures of the year are setting in. ginger has the forecast. >>> over the cliff? with just two days to go, congressional leaders try to come up with a plan to block deep budget cuts and prevent everyone's taxes from going up. is there any progress this morning? >>> moment of impact. this is not a movie. extraordinary new videotape coming in overnight as a passenger jet overshoots the runway and careens onto the highway. how did this happen? >>> and serenading a president. ♪ amazing grace >> hear the emotional song sung for president george h.w. bush by country superstars while his family held vigil at his hospital bed. >>> ah, the oak ridge boys, one of the former president's favorite bands getting a serenade getting together for the president who was in the hospital singing "amazing grace" and their big hit, "elvira," through the phone. great news. their serenade seemed to bring some good luck. the former p
on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have the latest on not just the breakdown of this offer, but by the response of some key senators this morning. good morning. >> yeah, that's right, carl. we saw the offer come in late last night and now we're seeing reaction early this morning. let me walk you through first of all of what the president laid down on the table yesterday, starting with taxes. the president is proposing now $1.2 trillion in new revenue increases, tax increases on individual income. that's lower than his initial offer after the election of
on the list. a long fall for america which was ranked first in 1988. the economist intelligence unit aimes to measure which country will provide the best opportunities for healthy, safe and prosperous lives ahead. 1k3* the winner of this year's lottery of life are wee ones births in switzerland, australia, norway, sweden and denmark. which i am sure are one country. this thing is already very suspect. the economist says the index was compiled using 11 statistically ipped caters noting being rich helps more than anything else, but things like crime, trust and public institutions and health of the family life matter too. all of this raises a question, can dogs jump over bottles? >> well, that's all of the evidence i need. dogs cannot jump over bottles. bernard, this is supposed to measure which countries will provide the healthiest, happiest life. but can we trust this study at all? >> well, first of all, let me just say i am offended that the study is racist. >> racist? >> boy, i tell you what it feels so good to be sank sanctimonious. how do you quantify? how do you measure happiness? if y
opportunity for america's agricultural producers in russia. consider that russia is the world's largest importer of beef on a quantity basis, with imports of nearly $4 billion last year. russia is the fifth -- world's fifth largest importer of pork products as well as the largest importer of dairy products. despite the problems we've encountered recently with respect to to our poultry exports, america remains the largest supplier of poultry to the russian market accounting for 50% last year. under the terms of russia's w.t.o. aaccession in august, it is adhering to w.t.o. rules regarding sanitary and phytosanitary measures. once we've enacted pntr, the united states will have the ability to enforce these commitments through the world trade organization dispute settlement process. it's important to note that our vote on passage of this bill is different than voting on a trade agreement where both sides make concessions in order to reach a conclusion. by contrast, our vote on the house-passed russia pntr bill is entirely one-sided in favor of the united states. russia joined the world tra
stories of 2012 and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the re-election of president barack obama, politics on the national level headed in a decidedly liberal direction. so what happened? and what does it mean for the country going forward? joining the panel this week, "wall streetf journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward and not to cut spending, but to increase spending. it is explicit from historic 20% of gdp to 25% of gdp. rather than cut spending, raise taxes as necessary to support the spending. and i would say that is in fact the french model. the question is whether that model can produce enough growt
the scream heard around the world when reran for president. dean says let's face it, america, tacks need to go up for everyone. now, this might not be what you expect from someone like howard dean. it's certainly not the president's position or the position of most americans. another new poll out today shows that most people like the president's idea of only raising taxes on other people. specifically, the top 2%. the problem is according to the congressional research service, the math doesn't add up. that tax hike would only give $678 billion in additional revenue over ten years, now, remember, we're $16 trillion in the debt. now, if we go with howard dean's idea, that gets us $2.8 trillion or about 17% of our debt. adam davidson is the cofounder of planet money and he did the math. he wrote in "the new york times" a while ago, a set of numbers that has stuck with me ever since that increasing the middle class tax burden 8% would have a bigger impact than taxing millionaires at 100%. of course, once you tax millionaires at 100%, there's nothing else left to get them the next year. even
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